Sketches

A quick way of visualizing a new interface by using paper and pen. Sketches are useful to validate product concepts and design approaches both with team members and users.

Just like your thoughts and ideas, sketches are in a constant state of flux, evolving and morphing as you reach a potential solution. Don’t think that you have to be able to draw in order to sketch, although having some experience with it does help.

  • Sketching is an expression of thinking and problem-solving.
  • It’s a form of visual communication, and, as in all languages, some ways of communicating are clearer than others.
  • Sketching is a skill: the more you do it, the better you’ll get at it.

When evaluating your sketches, ask yourself, “How could I better communicate these thoughts?” Getting caught up in evaluating your drawing ability is easy, but try to separate the two. Look at your sketch as if it were a poster. What’s the first thing that’s read? Where is the detailed info? Remember, the eye is drawn to the area with the most detail and contrast.

Just as one’s ability to enunciate words affects how well others understand them, one’s ability to draw does have an impact on how communicative a sketch is. The good news is that drawing and sketching are skills, and the more you do them, the better you’ll get.

OK, let’s get started – https://www.smashingmagazine.com/2011/12/the-messy-art-of-ux-sketching/

 

5 Tips to improve UX Sketches

  1. First Write Down the User Problem
  2. Sketch in Layers with Increasingly Darker Pens
  3. Start with the Smallest Screen and Work Up
  4. Compile Screen Sketches into a Paper Prototype
  5. Try the 20-minute Whiteboard Design Challenge

Learn more at: https://www.uxpin.com/studio/blog/5-tips-from-5-designers-to-improve-your-ux-sketches/

 

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